Monthly Archives: April 2014

Short Study on Deleuze, Hadewijch, and Immanence

Head on over to The De-Scribe, and check out David Dreidger’s recent set of posts examining the development of philosophies of immanence, and the use of immanence as a hermeneutic for a compelling reading of the Medieval mystic, Hadewijch, and her conception of love.

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Part 5

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The Radical Theology Lectionary: Easter Sunday

Text: John 20:1-18

Interpretation:

“The reality is that we don’t know exactly what historically happened on that first Easter Sunday morning, and if we do take a historical position we just create an argument. The Good News of this Easter is that we have a third option away from the argument about whether the resurrection happened or not as a fact: namely, this third option is the position of the women who encounter Christ in the garden, where the resurrection is too good to be true, and it’s too good to be false. The return of Jesus enacts in us a call to step away from the downward spiral of our typical lives, and of our sufferings, and of our angers, and our mournings, and our injustices, and in this suffering, find new life and New Creation. When it’s too good to be true, the absurdity of the resurrection calls us to joy. When it’s too good to be true, we are led from our ordinary lives to something extra-ordinary.”

— Christopher Rodkey, Too Good to be True: Radical Christian Preaching

The Radical Theology Lectionary: Good Friday

Text: John 18:1-19:42

Interpretation:

The true “nature” of man [sic] appears in Hegel, at the twilight of history, when man consents to his salvation and recognizes all the consequences this entails. It is most certainly Hegel’s doctrine of salvation–of a reconciliation, whose entire reality can be manifested in the world on this side of death–that accounts for the discreteness of his eschatology. Man’s final self-identity is not the product of forces immanent in history, but is finite spirit objectively reconciled with absolute Spirit on the Cross of Christ.

-Jean-Yves Lacoste, “Hegel and the Eschaton This Side of Death” in Experience and the Absolute: Disputed Questions on the Humanity of Man, 121

The Radical Theology Lectionary: Sixth Sunday in Lent

Text: Matthew 26.14-27.66

Commentary:

By following the way of the radical Christian, we can rejoice in the death of God, and be assured that the historical realization of the death of God is a full unfolding of the forward movement of the Incarnation. Just as the Crucifixion embodies and makes finally real a divine movement from transcendence to immanence, a movement of an originally transcendent God into the actuality of life and experience, so too the dawning of the death of God throughout the totality of experience progressively annuls every human or actual possibility of returning to transcendence.

Thomas J.J. Altizer, “A Wager” in Toward a New Christianity: Readings in the Death of God Theology, 305-306

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‘Gospel of Jesus’ Wife’ Papyrus Is Ancient, Not Fake, Scientists And Scholars Say

One more link for the day:

‘Gospel of Jesus’ Wife’ Papyrus Is Ancient, Not Fake, Scientists And Scholars Say

How Google Maps Gets Africa Wrong

I love cartography:

How Google Maps Gets Africa Wrong

CFP – Pittsburgh Continental Philosophy Conference – Approaching the Liminal

Pittsburgh Continental Philosophy Network

The Pittsburgh Continental Philosophy Network is pleased to announce that we are now accepting submissions for our first annual Pittsbugh Continental Philosophy Conference entitled, Approaching the Liminal: Pushing the Boundaries of Continental Philosophy (Sept. 26th and 27th). The conference will feature Dr. Tom Sparrow (Slippery Rock University) and Dr. Erik Garrett (Duquesne University) as keynotes. The full CFP can be found here: CFP – Approaching the Liminal (abstracts due by June 15th). Interested parties throughout the greater Pittsburgh area, and in a wide variety of fields (including philosophy, psychology, communications, theology, and sociology, to name only a few) are strongly encouraged to apply.

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The Radical Theology Lectionary: Fifth Sunday in Lent

TEXT: John 11.1-45

COMMENTARY:

“It is love, human and divine, which overcomes death in nations and generations and in all the horror of our time. Help has become almost impossible in the face of the monstrous powers which we are experiencing. Death is given power over everything finite, especially in our period of history. But death is given no power over love. Love is stronger. It creates something new out of the destruction caused by death; it bears everything and overcomes everything. It is at work where the power of death is strongest, in war and persecution and homelessness and hunger and physical death itself. It is omnipresent and here and there, in the smallest and most hidden ways as in the greatest and most visible ones, it rescues life from death. It rescues each of us, for love is stronger than death.”

-Paul Tillich, “Love is Stronger than Death” in The Essential Tillich, 161

Big Discount at IUP

For a couple more days, Indianna University Press is doing a 50% off one book sale (promo code: MAD50). You might not want to miss this. IUP carries an extremely large selection of the lesser known Heidegger books, plus a range of philosophy and phenomenology texts from Caputo and Marion, to Henry, Derrida, Sallis, Young, and many more. LINK